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Question:And was the Catholic Church's failure to convert these people a major factor in the slaughter by Spanish conquistadors, led by Pizarro and de Soto?


Best Answer - Chosen by Asker: And was the Catholic Church's failure to convert these people a major factor in the slaughter by Spanish conquistadors, led by Pizarro and de Soto?

The Inca people live on today, the Inca Empire was crushed by the Spanish due, primarily, to diseases such as small pox and the common cold.

The Spanish conquest of the native peoples of Central and South America began with disease. The illnesses that the Europeans brought with them ran like wildfire among the natives, reaching the Inca people before the actual Europeans did. This did much of the 'work' for the Spanish, essentially crippling the Incan military forces leaving them weakened and 'ripe' for conquering.
The refusal of the Incan people to convert to Christianity is one convient reason (among many) that the Spanish used to further decimate the population.

The main cause of the decimation of Incas was the Spanish, who exterminated the Incas with mass murder and smallpox. The Catholic church shared the conquistadors' lust for gold: failure of the Incas to convert was merely a convenient excuse for genocide and theft.

The Incas are not extinct, descendants of the Incas are still alive in Peru, Chile, Bolivia. The Inca empire was conquered for a variety of historical reason, including the technological superiority of the Spanish.

Don't confuse a political entity with the people who made it up. For example, the various Celtic political entities were conquered by the Romes and German, but Celtic peoples still live in the British Ilse, France, Spain, Switzerland, Italy, the Balkins, etc.

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the pan pipes

War!

Mostly it was for the gold.

Tupac Amaru's failed revolt made things hasten.

War, disease, greed. What did it achieve?